919-469-9986 DIPLOMATES OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF PERIODONTOLOGY

LANAP® Procedure

WHAT IS LANAP? Traditional gum surgery involves cutting away some of the gum tissue and reshaping the bone underneath.  LANAP® is a progressive technique using a specialized laser to destroy the bacteria which cause disease and alters the tissue so that it has the opportunity to heal. The use of the laser is less invasive than traditional scalpel surgery & results in a much faster and less painful recovery! HOW LANAP WORKS LANAP® Procedure Animation A. Depth of pocket is measured under anesthesia B. Laser selectively removes pocket lining C. Ultrasonic instruments clean root surfaces D. Laser disinfects pocket & seals the wound E. Tissue is compressed against the tooth F. Bite is adjusted through selective grinding G. Healing results in new attachment YOUR SURGICAL VISITS Usually, we treat one half of the mouth at a time. The surgical visits are ideally made 1-2 weeks apart & take about 2 hours each on average. The mouth is numbed, just like if you were having a filling or crown. Sedation is available if you prefer. The pockets are measured while you are numb, so that more accurate measurements can be made without causing discomfort. A first pass is made with the laser, giving the doctor access to the depth of the pockets & allowing better visualization of the roots of the teeth. The teeth are cleaned very thoroughly using ultrasonic instruments which have tips that vibrate very quickly, loosening any deposits on the teeth & flushing them away with an irrigating solution. A second pass is made with the laser, disinfecting the pockets & sealing them up through the formation of a stable blood...

Scaling and Root Planing

Scaling and root planing, also known as “deep cleaning,” is a form of nonsurgical periodontal therapy and is often the first step in periodontal treatment.  The objective of scaling and root planing is to remove etiologic agents from above and below the gum line which cause inflammation to the gum tissue and surrounding bone. Common agents removed by this conventional periodontal therapy include dental plaque and calculus (tartar).  Scaling and root planing is considered the basic treatment of periodontal diseases and may be the only treatment required to treat mild cases of periodontitis; however, it may also be the initial therapy prior to future surgical needs. For the procedure to be considered effective, the patient must be able to be maintained at a level of periodontal health that will prevent reinfection with periodontal pathogens.  This requires optimal home care and ongoing periodontal maintenance therapy, usually every 3 to 4 months to sustain...

Periodontal Surgery

Nonsurgical therapy often may be sufficient to eliminate the signs and symptoms of mild periodontal diseases. However, when periodontal probing depths are sufficiently deep, nonsurgical treatment may be ineffective in establishing health or preventing recurrence of disease.  In such cases, a surgical approach to periodontal treatment is often taken. This approach allows improved access to the periodontium for more thorough root surface cleaning and recontouring of the damaged supporting bone.  In some cases, surgical therapy can provide an opportunity to reconstruct or regenerate bone and gum tissue lost due to periodontal disease. The ultimate goal with this technique is to reduce the periodontal pocket and control the destructive inflammatory process involved in...

Bone Regeneration

Guided bone regeneration (GBR) and Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) are periodontal surgical procedures that serve to direct the growth of new bone and gum tissue at sites having insufficient volumes or dimensions of bone or gum tissue for proper function, esthetics or prosthetic restoration. Often, these regenerative surgical procedures are used to repair bone loss around teeth that have been affected by inflammatory periodontal disease or damaged during the removal of an adjacent tooth (typically following the removal of a wisdom tooth). To enhance the results of regeneration, we adopt the most advanced materials and techniques for predictable regeneration of lost bone and gum tissue around teeth. Before Guided Tissue Regeneneration: After Guided Tissue...

Gum Grafting

When gum recession occurs, the body loses a natural defense against both bacterial penetration and trauma.  When there is only minor recession, some healthy gum tissue often remains and protects the tooth, so that no treatment other than modifying home care practices is necessary. However, when recession extends past the protective gum tissue and into the mucosa, the first line of defense against bacterial penetration is lost.  The recession and corresponding underlying bone loss can affect long term tooth survival, and in severe cases lead to tooth loss. Also, gum recession often results in root sensitivity to hot and cold foods as well as an unsightly appearance of the exposed root.  Occasionally the exposed root surface, which is much softer than enamel, will develop root cavities and/or notching. Some of the most common types of gum grafting include: Free Gingival Graft:  This procedure serves to reestablish a stable, healthy band of protective gum tissue around the tooth.  A layer of tissue is removed from the palate (roof of the mouth) and relocated to the area affected by gum recession. Connective Tissue Graft:  This procedure is commonly used to cover exposed root surfaces.  Tissue is removed fairly painlessly from the inner layer of the palate and relocated to the site of gum recession. Acellular dermal matrix allograft:  This procedure uses medically processed, donated human tissue as a tissue source for the graft.  The advantage of this is procedure is that there is no need for a donor site from the patient’s palate (and thus, less...

Crown Lengthening

Crown lengthening is performed as part of a recommended treatment plan for a tooth that requires a crown or other restoration.  Crown lengthening is a surgical procedure that reshapes the gum tissue and supporting bone in order to expose an adequate amount of healthy tooth structure.  This allows your dentist appropriate access to the tooth and ensures a proper fit for a new crown or filling. In addition it provides increased retention of the crown, reducing the possibility of the crown coming uncemented in the future. The procedure also allows you to clean the edge of the restoration, reducing the chance for future decay and gum...